Some irony of the bitter sort for this rare personal post. On Saturday night, I was in LA at the YSF gala/show, and had a chance to meet the awesome Max Adler after the show.  We  had a lovely and personal conversation for a few minutes about how much the Karofsky/Kurt storyline on Glee has meant to me and my son, who is gay and has been mercilessly bullied for years, to the point of attempting to take his life in the same manner as the show depicted.  The show gave me a jumping off point to talk to my son about how devastating it is when someone tries to hurt themselves, and a reminder that he matters.
I left feeling positive, happy to have had a moment to tell Max how much I appreciated his sensitive performance, how grateful I am to the show, and was ready to come home to share that with my son. 
Instead, I came home to my son being taken to the hospital because he tried to kill himself again after another day of being brutalized by hateful people who don’t like that he’s different.
This isn’t about him being gay, him being autistic, or him being an atheist - he’s all of those things.  This is about individuals not allowing someone to be Not Like Them. Every dirty look you send someone, every mean whisper, every ugly tag on Tumblr, every us vs. them comment (even if it’s because you think YOU’RE the different one), every time you say something derogatory or othering. It’s about that.
It builds up.  It becomes a weight on someone’s shoulder that they can’t bear. Please think about how you talk to others. How you talk ABOUT others. Even if you think you’re the one that’s always mistreated - it doesn’t give you the right to lash out, either. You’re just stooping to the bullies’ level.
Someone being different from you affects you exactly 0%. Being cruel to someone for being different affects them 100%. Now if you’ll excuse me, I’m off to the hospital to try and convince my son that it indeed does get better.

Some irony of the bitter sort for this rare personal post. On Saturday night, I was in LA at the YSF gala/show, and had a chance to meet the awesome Max Adler after the show.  We  had a lovely and personal conversation for a few minutes about how much the Karofsky/Kurt storyline on Glee has meant to me and my son, who is gay and has been mercilessly bullied for years, to the point of attempting to take his life in the same manner as the show depicted.  The show gave me a jumping off point to talk to my son about how devastating it is when someone tries to hurt themselves, and a reminder that he matters.

I left feeling positive, happy to have had a moment to tell Max how much I appreciated his sensitive performance, how grateful I am to the show, and was ready to come home to share that with my son. 

Instead, I came home to my son being taken to the hospital because he tried to kill himself again after another day of being brutalized by hateful people who don’t like that he’s different.

This isn’t about him being gay, him being autistic, or him being an atheist - he’s all of those things.  This is about individuals not allowing someone to be Not Like Them. Every dirty look you send someone, every mean whisper, every ugly tag on Tumblr, every us vs. them comment (even if it’s because you think YOU’RE the different one), every time you say something derogatory or othering. It’s about that.

It builds up.  It becomes a weight on someone’s shoulder that they can’t bear. Please think about how you talk to others. How you talk ABOUT others. Even if you think you’re the one that’s always mistreated - it doesn’t give you the right to lash out, either. You’re just stooping to the bullies’ level.

Someone being different from you affects you exactly 0%. Being cruel to someone for being different affects them 100%. Now if you’ll excuse me, I’m off to the hospital to try and convince my son that it indeed does get better.